Therapeutic Heated Corn Bag Tutorial - Rachel Teodoro

Therapeutic Heated Corn Bag Tutorial

About a month ago, I was in a pretty major car accident. I was rear ended from behind while I was stopped. Let me tell you, whiplash is a real thing and it's something I deal with on a daily basis.  For weeks, I ice and heat, heat and ice. I can't tell you how very thankful I am that I had some of my handmade therapeutic corn bags at home. They have been a lifesaver! But they aren't just for accident recovery! We tuck them into the bottom of the bed before we go to sleep at night, we snuggle up with them under a blanket when we can't seem to get warm, I use them under my bowl when I'm trying to raise my yeast rolls. Every single person in my family has one and all of us use them daily.

You may have seen these bags made with rice, I use corn. I think that it holds in the heat better and for much longer. You can also place these corn bags in the freezer. They stay cold just as well as they stay hot. 

How to make a therapeutic heated corn bag

These heated corn bags really are a family favorite and since my accident they have been a necessity. I can't wait to share the tutorial with you so that you can make your very own. Or, if making them isn't your thing, I have a great friend who has a small business and she makes them. You can find out how you can purchase a Hot Sack from her and her company.


You are going to start with your fabric. I find that heavy cotton fabric works better than a fleece fabric {the fleece feels damp when heated}. You will cut your doubled over fabric 12" by 10.5". I like to take 24" of fabric and fold it so I have less seems to sew, but you cut two pieces and place them together to make your corn bag as well.


How to make a therapeutic heated corn bag

Put your fabric right sides together. Start by sewing up your seams. If you folded your fabric, you should only have your two sides and a top. I sew both the long sides closed and turn the fabric and open it. You will only have one side open now. Take that final open side and turn the top down on both sides about a quarter inch, ironing it down to stay in place.

You may be thinking, if I put corn in these bags and then microwave them isn't it going to pop? Nope. You use feed corn for these heated bags. You can find it at your local farm supply store or here on Amazon.

How to make a therapeutic heated corn bag

You don't want to fill your corn bag too full. I like to fill it about half way full {about three and a half cups}. If you have a child with sensory issues, you can fill it fuller, since the weighted bag is more of a comfort to them. The fuller the bag though the longer it takes to heat and you run the risk of burning your fabric in your microwave.

How to make a therapeutic heated corn bag

Once your bag is stuffed with corn, you will sew your final seam. This part is tricky since you have a bag full of corn attached but just take your time.


After you are finished sewing, you can pop your bag in the microwave and heat it. I heat ours for three minutes {I like mine pipping hot!}. The kids heat theirs for two minutes. For your first time, only heat it for two  minutes to see how strong your microwave it. You can burn your fabric so be cautious. Never heat these corn bags for more than four minutes!

I slip mine into the bottom of my bed to warm my feet. I'm always so surprised that the corn bag stays heated for as long as it does {hours!} at the bottom of my bed.

How to make a therapeutic heated corn bag

We just love our heated corn bags and I know you will too!

How to make a therapeutic heated corn bag

If you prefer to purchase a Hot Sack instead of making one, please visit my friend Stephanie's website. Five years ago I purchased my first corn bag from her and have been hooked ever since!

How to make a therapeutic heated corn bag
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